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CSPAN
May 2, 2012 7:00am EDT
use as a launching pad for attacks against the united states. >> thank you. let me just conclude by saying that former cia director mike hayden used used the analogy of a football field, the lines on the football field, and he talked about our intelligence operatives and others as the players on the field. and he said we need them to get chalk on their cleats, go right up to the line in carrying out what our approved policies of the united states. and if you think about it that way, it is really important to have policies that are transparent so that those who are carrying out the mission and those in the united states and those around the world who are trying to understand the mission know where the lines are. if we don't know what the lines are, some people will be risk averse, other people commit excesses. we have certain seeing a few of those, which are black eyes on our country. so i just want to applaud the fact that john brennan has come over here from the white house, spent over an hour with us, laying out in great detail what the rules are for something that has been reveal
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
causization. there's a whole range of grievances that the united states had against great britain in the early 19th century. many are associated with maritime disputes between great britain and the united states because this is the middle of that -- napolian wars. they are trying to establish trade, and they are impressing seamen from american vessels because they need to script crews to keep the royal navy manned because they were disputing with the british and the indians on the frontier, and british policy affected the prizes very badly, and prizes for american exports slumped during this period causing an agricultural depression making people angry. there's a whole range of those sort of grievances. basically, i think why the war was ultimately fought and why it was fought when it was because many of the disputes have been preceded in 1812 by a number of years without necessarily producing the declaration of war was that by the summer of 1811, the main grievance was something called the council, a british form of executive order, the american equivalent is the executive order iss
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 11:00pm EDT
relatively confidently say the united states and europe remain each other's best parkhurst and that when the american president or european leader looks how the public and says pudu one call when there's a problem of the person on the other side of the cleantech. my judgment is that is not going to change anytime soon partly because of the affinity of interest of the values and also there aren't other options and even though there are emerging countries out your waist count on our european allies and to rely on our european allies more than we can count on a cost-cutting. at the same time i think it's clear that we are at the cusp of a major historic transition in the global landscape in which the world that nato represents his losing the primacy it enjoyed the last 200 years and if you look at the share of global product represented by nato and i would include japan because they are a part of the western world since world war ii we've gone from roughly 70% of the global product to 50% and we are headed towards 40% and that says to me the big security question of the day are about h
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 1:00am EDT
debated near the two weeks and it was touch and go. why it was expedient for the united states to go to great britain after all. >>host: did we have the standing army? >> it was small. on paper bree word to have 10,000. on the eve of the war it is about half of that. but the federalist were opposed to war. at the time they were compliant the the federalist but the not unlike jefferson but there were based roughly new england and in particular herb massachusetts and connecticut. the stake government's probably the majority of people republican-led congressmen were assaulted by people. the president was haying in effigy. the federalist that the republicans wordpro french and it would serve the interest to napoleon. they wanted to train with the british empire and generally and their wanted to cut off train but to also the board was not in their interest as they understood it. it was local and eventually that to culminates at the harvard convention late 1814. the purpose was to pressure the government to give a defense which england does not do well by that stage. and then to pay for the d
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 7:30am EDT
gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious father, we thank you for this clear whether today. our gracious fa
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 9:00pm EDT
with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation or a configuration of the peninsula that would cause the two to butt heads as they did in 1953, and so i think any time there is serious thought given to some sort of military action, this is constantly at the top -- not even the top, but half way up the ladder, this is a concern that every u.s. president, i think, has had to think about seriously. i think that's certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became thee top foreign policy issue on which the administration saw a revolution, a final resolution. now, we can debate whether that was the right or wrong thing. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think that nothing was resolved there, and, you know, that's a completely different question. i mean i think the point for korea is that i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority for an administration. it's been a crisis that you wanted to so
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 12:00pm EDT
question. could it be for the be first time in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now, cast your mind back a decade ago or little over a decade ago. that question would have seemed absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would it need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability, for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we we have become o the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke that i heard probably about 5,000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19th century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is pegging up washing, and a kazakh soldier rides up and declares, old woman, from this day forth, this land is no longer poland, it is imperial russia. and then he rides off. and she watches him go, and she says, thank god, i couldn't stand another po
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
brings size to part 4, the political ad in the united states. so as i said at the beginning, 2010 was the summer of hate, two years ago. and you probably remember terry jones, burned a copy of the koran. you might remember the beginning of an anti-sharia move and that push is to pass legislation that a state level to be in sharia law, islamic law starts in oklahoma. there's this huge muslim population. there's not a huge muslim population oklahoma. it's ridiculous and the whole movement is ridiculous. there have been no cases have sharia law actually been sighted. one exception in new jersey, which was overturned. and of course you remember that summer as well as two years before, all of the rumors that obama our president is muslim. one third of all believed this according to polling at the time. one quarter of the entire electorate believe this. and of course the ground zero mosque. the ground zero mosque becomes the political litmus test to determine how politicians stand on this key issue. mayor bloomberg, newt gingrich is against it. but even as a political litmus test out in
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 1:40pm EDT
1939 in the united states, just before world war ii. when it was created, it was part of the department of justice, and then it was created, it was thought to be -- it's charge was to protect individual rights, fundamental individual rights. but people were not exactly sure what that meant. with a first thought it meant was labor rights. the rights of workers trying to collectively organize into unions. when world war ii started, race became much more prominent on the national political scene. the civil rights section started to think about how to protect the rights of african-americans. as a result they started to think about how to protect the rights of african-american workers. in the 1940s, it the civil rights takes a whole bunch of cases, and it prosecutes all kinds of employers for violation of civil rights causes. >> was informed by order or legislation? >> it was formed by executive order, franklin roosevelt, and at the request of frank murphy, who was the attorney general. frank murphy was a big labor guy from michigan. he was a very big supporter of labor unions and
CSPAN
May 18, 2012 5:00pm EDT
in a conflict can be destructive to the united states but other countries as well and that is one of the things about military operations in cyberspace with cascading effect that are hard to predict. we have concerns about this and this is why we created joint military platforms like a strategic security dialogue to talk about issues that we feel our potential for friction in the u.s./china relationship. cyber is one of those areas. we don't talk about space, nuclear and missile defense areas as part of the strategic dialogue. >> you mentioned last year spending was almost double what the public acknowledgment was. what things will you give us as examples that they are spending on this year? you did not speculate on the number but what they are spending on this year but not publicly acknowledged? >> we think their nuclear force modernization occurs and research and development money that goes through their defense industry we also think is from a different budget, a different account. some foreign acquisitions come from a different account as well and some local contributions go to l
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 12:00pm EDT
, and he said that the united states wanted to be a tremendous partner and cheerleader of the development of brazil's offshore industry. now, mr. president, i have to tell you that was like rubbing salt in the wound of tens of thousands of oil field workers and others who are suffering because of the obama administration policy here in this country really discouraging energy development. the way president obama proposed to be a strong supporter and partner and cheerleader of brazilian offshore development was through an ex-im bank loan and there are many of these sorts of loans. again, in august, 2009, talking about brazil, the case i mentioned, "the wall street journal" reported an editorial that -- quote -- "the u.s. is going to lend billions of dollars to brazil's state-owned oil company, petrobrass to finance exploration of the huge offshore delivery in brazil's oil field near rio de janeiro" -- close quote. again the ex-im bank provided a $2 billion loan to aid brazilian oil production and that's what president obama was cheering and encouraging and making happen. it's ha
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 8:30am EDT
have to make an impact in two to three places of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential m
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 1:25am EDT
world, the united states of america. filet and i have adopted as my home. it has paid less and less literally to the translation. there has been a lot of more translation of english literature than there was from the land that many considered to be the end of the. >>host: is there a contemporary woman right to you would recommend? >>guest: absolutely. let me say first in spite of the islamic republic or because it is usually u.s. wants. the big men are center stage. one example. 1947 the first major collection of short stories pro but then passed away a couple of weeks ago. at the age of 19. when they pull it goes back and cannot you don't need a directors, crew, the women are formed in the segregated society. 1947 you have those 30 equal to the number of men. but look gain at conscientious when this talk about the national poets of our country. not recognized by the government but by the people. inside and outside that could to save. the first time has become day woman from my country. >>host: we're really lowered cover raised and studied? >> i was born in tehran. appearance took e
CSPAN
May 11, 2012 5:00pm EDT
plan for managing this transition i think it will withstand the test of time. at the united states in europe go their separate ways and figuring out how to preserve a rules-based system, then i hear that the next 20 or 30 years will be a very substantive period and international history. .. >> we are chasing to get out. we collectively, the reliance as you were just saying, senator, and i think it will be a long time coming before nato engages in the same kind of operation if engaged in in afghanistan. libya, i think the success more conclusive, but many of the conditions that were present in libya are not being replicated elsewhere, particularly in syria. a u.n. legal authority, the approval of the arab world, the degree to which libya was close to reservoirs of european power and, therefore, easy to the europeans did you even though they still relied heavily on us. in that regard i think some of the most important nato programs moving forward will not be the deployment of force, even though surely there will be some of that. they will be the broad array of programs, the partnerships
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 12:00am EDT
assets from the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation that would somehow cause them to butt heads as they did in 1953, so i think any time there is a serious thought given to some sort of military action this is constantly at the top, not even the top even halfway up the escalation ladder this is constantly the concern that i think every u.s. president has had to think about seriously, so that is certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, the united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became the top foreign policy issue on which the head ministrations of a resolution. now, we can debate whether there was the right or wrong finger. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think nothing was resolved and, you know, that's a completely different question. i think the plant for korea is i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority. it's been a crisis the you want to solve at least in the sense of preventing it from becoming a big
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 8:00pm EDT
as monday to pass and send the message to the world that the united states senate supports the stated policy of our government in this critical issue. nobody wants iran to be able to move forward and attain nuclear capacity, and i am -- i'd be very concerned about moving forward on this language as it currently appears to me to be stated. mr. reid: is there an objection by either senator kyl or senator -- mr. kyl: yes, mr. president, for the reasons noted, i would hope that we could work our colleagues to fix the problem here. until we do i would have to object. the presiding officer: objection is heard. mr. reid: mr. president, this is sump a such an interesting conversation on the floor. i didn't have the papers. i don't blame nigh friend infrastructure arizona for not having the dowvment i don't blame nigh friend from missouri for only having a half-hour to look at this. this thing was given to the republican leader yesterday in midday. all right? now, mr. president, the language they're objecting to was in the base bill. so unless they didn't read the base bill, we have a p
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 9:00am EDT
deploys australia is there's a friend and ally of the united states. we are not calling for australian membership. we are calling for a partnership to develop. australia trains more energetically with germany and britain and france. you already trained significantly with the united states. let's say there is another humanitarian disaster the way there was in december of 2004 what happened on december 26th, australia, united states and japan and india deployed together to help the people of sri lanka and southern india because we had trained together in the air and sea. we want that type of cooperation. you have been a stalwart ally in afghanistan but you had to do it on the run not having worked very much with the european allies. it is inculcating patterns of cooperation and military training and confers no obligation on the part of parter countries. in essence it is the best of both worlds for the asia-pacific allies from my perspective. >> also hearing the most frequent complaint from australian officials is you are more than happy to use soldiers and resources in battle
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 11:00pm EDT
president of the united states or even better than that the mayor of new york city the guy in front of you could be a future nobel laureate not to your right but certainly the one to your left. it's even worse than it looks in which they argue that washington partisanship has caused congress to become dysfunctional. we talked to the authors on wednesday washington journal. this is just under an hour. >> the gentleman that for a book are taking a look at congress it's even worse than that looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism. joining us, the author norman and co-author resident scholar of the american enterprise institute thomas mann of the brookings institution where he served studies senior fellow. gentlemen, thanks for joining us. >> happy to be with you. >> the question is if it is worse than it looks, what exactly is worse? >> guest: we are now in a situation which we have a fundamental mismatch between our political parties which would become intensely polarized and operate much like parties in the parliamentary system oppositional,
CSPAN
May 16, 2012 11:00pm EDT
united states. un that's what we're talking aboutre here today. tay i just. heard the republican leader say there is no budget. i really -- i don't know how to say this.es sometimes i wonder if colleagues pay attention to what they're here. voting on here. last in here in august we didn't pass a budget resolution pass a budget resolution. instead, we passed in a resolution is purely a congressional it never goes toresident the president for his signature has to pass both bodies and be signed by the president. last year, instead of a budget resolution, we did a budget law called the budget control act. the budget control act set the budget for the next two years for this year and next. more than that, it set ten years of spending caps, saving $900 billion. madam president in addition, the budget control act gave a special committee the authority to reform the tax system and the entitlement system of the country and it said if you come to an agreement special committee, your action cannot be filibustered. you have to go right to the floor for a vote. and if you don't agree, there w
CSPAN
May 3, 2012 6:00am EDT
just a responsible, that's false and ludicrous. now, my view on immigration in the united states and illegal immigration is formed from several different areas of experience. first had to do with my role as a staff officer for the third armored cavalry regiment, and providing active duty soldiers to assist with joint operations on a reservation which straddles arizona and mexico to help interdict the smuggling of drugs. it's also informed by my role as a life prosecutor prosecuting albany duis in maricopa county with the passage of an amendment to specifically deny bail to those in the country without lawful authority who committed serious offenses. anytime that i have someone who is a mexican national or even from canada, the accused of a felony dui, they would be admitted to bail in which they would feel to show for subsequent prosecution. then in supervising prosecutions are maricopa county, i dealt first in what circumstances in which drug cartels in mexico would order cars from street gangs in phoenix. which would then be picked up by someone who crossed the border, ostensibly a
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 6:00pm EDT
distant echo of the iraqi war. and mexico's abiding distrust and resentment of the united states can be traced to the mexican war. the mexican war also hastened the civil war. it might not have been fought if the mexican war had not opened the volatile slavery debate. now, the mexican war's often confused with the texan war for independence from mexico ten years earlier in 1836. the texas revolution is known for the battles of the alamo and san ha sin toe -- ha seen toe and the exploits of sam houston and davy crockett. the mexican war is known as polk's war. the 11th president, james k. polk, supervised it from its beginning in may 1846 to the treaty signing 21 months later. the peace treaty transferred 530,000 square miles from mexico to the united states, incredible territory. from mexico we obtained the future states of california, new mexico, arizona, nevada, utah and parts of colorado and wyoming. literally 42% of mexico's territory at that time. the major battles were fought at palo alto, monterey and buena vista, the gates of mexico city. always outnumbered, the americans won ev
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 9:00am EDT
the barriers that are making our world such -- an unhappy place. >> over the years the united states and other democratic countries have imposed sanctions on the burmese government to pressure for change. now that there seems to be some progress at what pace should those sanctions be lifted? how does the u.s. provide rewards for progress without losing he have arerage for further change? >> i understand from a news broadcast this morning that senator mccain is thinking of the suspension of sanctions rather than lifting of sanctions. it possible first step. what has been done at the e.u., what has been done by the e.u., they would suspend sanctions but not lift them all together. that is a way sending a strong message that we will help the process of democratization. if this is not maintained we will have this think of other ways of making sure that the aspirations of people of burma for democracy is respected. i am am not against the suspension of sanctions as long as the people of the united states feel this is the right thing to do at the moment. i do, i do have a caution though. i som
CSPAN
May 24, 2012 9:00am EDT
that's the reason i'm running for a second term as president of the united states of america. [cheers and applause] .. >> his working assumption is, if ceos and wealthy investors like camera get rich, and the rest of us automatically will, too. there was a woman in iowa who shared heard stories of the financial struggles, and he gave her an answer right out of an economic textbook. he said are part activity equals our income. [laughter] and the notion was that somehow the reason people can't pay their bills is because they are not working hard enough. if they got more productive, then suddenly their incomes would go up. well, those of us who spent time in the real world -- [laughter] know the problem isn't the american people are not productive enough. you've been working harder than ever. the challenge we face right now, and the challenge we faced for over a decade is that harder work has not led to higher income. and bigger profits at the top have that lead to better jobs. what governor romney doesn't seem to get is that a healthy economy doesn't just mean a few folks in ma
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 12:00pm EDT
west, including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like richard clarke were ringing alarm bells at the white house level. again, at that point, when we go back and look, it administration at that point was focused on things like the balkans and the kosovo war which was 1999. >> putting out fires elsewhere in the national security arena. >> yes. >> you talk about this wave of al qaeda violence. then they get beaten back. sometimes because of their own actions. what caused the temporary defeat the first time? was a launch into afghanistan? >> actually, it is almost the reverse of what we just outlined. the host that they had, the taliban regime, was overthrown. in addition to that, we saw the u.s. approach that was focused mostly on clandestine services. the cia come in a range of other intelligence services in a geospatial way, and special operations forces targeting in afghanistan and in afghanistan and other locations. >> we are talking about in 2001 how the united states fought back by sending in cia and special forces green berets working together on the g
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 6:00pm EDT
united states. that's something that's extremely important and that's forgotten about that the spirit of st. louis was involved in. the other thing, the other tour that's very important was his goodwill tour to latin america which took place in december 1927 at the invitation of dwight morrow, the u.s. ambassador to mexico, and who would later become his father-in-law, lindbergh's father-in-law. but in this light which lasted until january, february 1928, he flew to, from mexico -- from washington to mexico city to central america through the caribbean ending up in havana and then back to st. louis. and this was, as i said, at dwight morrow's request to try to develop a sense of goodwill toward latin america which had been rather anti-american at the time as a result of the situation in mexico and nicaragua. the importantthing about this flight -- the important thing about this flight, though, is that it makes lindbergh known to one, the head of pan american airwaves. and lindbergh eventually becomes affiliated as a technical consultant to pan be american and lays out their rou
CSPAN
May 29, 2012 12:00pm EDT
asked to explain his attack in the united states in view of taking oath not to harm it when he was awarded his american citizenship. he responded that he lied when he took the oath. that shahzad's lie amount to betrayal and does not fall under permissible lying if the enemy during times of war. please request that pakistani taliban brothers to address this matter. also draw their attention to the fact that brother faisal shahzad appeared in photograph alongside commander f masoud. leader of attp. when he acquires american citizenship this requires taking an oath to not to harm america if he is unaware of this matter he should be informed of it. we must act swiftly to remove the suspicion that he engaged in the betrayal. the times square attempted attack was not only one that had the al qaeda no hand in pakistan. it is clear from the letters that the group's indiscriminate attacks, pakistani taliban's indiscrimenant attacks against muslims were of major concern to al qaeda. this led them to write a letter to respected brother massoud, the leader of the ttp. the authors explicitly st
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 4:30pm EDT
for profiles aaron burr, vice president of the united states. he told former secretary alexander hamilton in a duel. mr. brands represents a different standard than your politician to a collection of letters between aronberg and his daughter, theodosia. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> i am delighted to speak here. i was like to speak in washington with where the audiences are well informed and engaged. having just finished teaching a semester for the year at the university of texas, isolated to speech or not it's the people you don't have to be here. there will be no tests. i say this sincerely. i'm very flattered you took the time in your evening to come listen to me. i think that my students by and large are interested in the subject, but i know perfectly well that if they did not test, it did, academic papers or rather, bo, the sympathies to be empty. none of you have to be here, but she did, and i find that very flattering. i could i supposed to be a test at the end. the title of my talk on which i forgot until jamie just mentioned is the unknown aaron burr. i'm goin
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 11:00pm EDT
worry is the most massive mining project now being plan in the united states, the pebble project. a multibillion dollar gold and copper mine in the bristol bay area of alaska, which poses a severe threat to the survival of the world's most important salmon fisheries. along with the livelihood and culture of the native peoples of alaska. this is just about to come before the government for approval or not. it would be a catastrophic project if it goes ahead. and these are just a few examples of a global pattern of intrusive traction ex-extraction in wilderness areas. i want to talk about the risk that arises from using advanced technology to distract oil and gas from unyielding rock formations or convert undesirable oil supplies like extra heavy crude into useable liquids. with all the easy oil gone and the easy natural gas, the only way for the oil companies to maintain production, is a said earlier, is it -- is to attack these leftover, unconventional sources of energy, and this involves going after the large shale formations we have in the united states and canada, some in europe
CSPAN
May 23, 2012 9:00am EDT
reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., may 23, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the majority leader. the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 400, s. 3187, a bill to amend the federal food, drug and cosmetic act, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. reid: we are now on the motion to proceed to the f.d.a. user fees bill. the republicans will control the first half-hour, the majority the second half-hour. we're working on an agreement to consider amendments to the f.d.a. bill. we're close to being
CSPAN
May 22, 2012 11:00pm EDT
vice president of the united states, joe biden. [cheers and applause] >> thanks, y'all, very, very much. molly, thank you. [cheers and applause] i'm so glad i'm molly's friend. thank you very much. now, i don't know if you have seats behind you, but if you do, please take your seats. you don't? i see some over here. yes, we will. ladies and gentlemen, -- [chanting] well, i think we can too. folks, it's really -- ladies and gentlemen, it's a pleasure to be with you, and whomever is chanting. i -- folks, i'd like to, especially for those of you standing, not make this too long. what i'd like to do is -- folks, i, i'd like to have a straightforward discussion with you as straight as i can be and make as it plain as i can, and i'd like to get right to the heart of the matter. you all know what we inherited, and how and what governor romney's line of argument is. he says -- he says that since we've gotten in office, things have gotten much worse. he says our policies are the problem. well, as former senator pat and good phren of mine used to say, everyone's entitled to their own opinion
CSPAN
May 17, 2012 12:00pm EDT
presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: pule j.watford of california to be united states judge for the ninth circuit. mr. reid: madam president, i ask -- let's see. i have a cloture motion. i want that reported, please. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. clerithe clerk: cloture motion: we, the undersigned senators, in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the standing rules of the senate, do hereby move to bring to a close debate on nomination of paul j. wattford of california to be the united states circuit judge for the ninth circuit signed by 17 senators as follows -- mr. reid: madam president, i would ask that the reading of the names be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that the mandatory quorum under rule 22 be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask, madam president, the senate resume legislative session. the presiding officer: without objection. the senate resumes legislative session. mr. reid: and what is the pending business? the presiding officer: the motion t
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:00am EDT
. and the united states. so as i said at the beginning, 2010 was the summer of hate, two years ago. and you probably remember terry jones who promised to burn a copy of the quran. you might remember the beginning of an anti-sharia movement that pushes to pass legislation at a state level to ban sharia law, islamic law. it starts in oklahoma where there's this huge muslim population. no, there's knotts a huge miss -- there's not a huge muslim population in oklahoma. it's ridiculous, and the whole movement is ridiculous since there have been no cases of sharia law actually being cited with one exception in new jersey which was then overturned. and, of course, you remember that summer as well as two years before all of the rumors that obama, our president, is muslim. one-third of all republicans believed this according to polling at the time. one-quarter of the entire electorate believes this. and, of course, the ground zero mosque. the ground zero mosque becomes a political litmus test to determine how politicians stand on this key issue. mayor bloomberg, for it. newt gingrich, he's again
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
you look in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in can
CSPAN
May 31, 2012 5:00pm EDT
from civil society that i would through the auspices of the united states in an account other, that i would make a proposal at council to try to make available those proposals in a public way. i expressed that to the itu officials as well as giving an indication that we will be making a proposal. we haven't yet worked out -- it hasn't been agreed to by counsel and we haven't worked out modalities for doing that, but we are very aware of this issue and i think this is a process benefit by making available those proposals that people can see them. >> thank you. now, my other question is this, you can tell by virtue of the interest we have here today and in other places than in the u.s., there is beginning to be a knowledge about and concerned about potentially the proposals that could be raised. we've mentioned some of the countries from which there might need concern or proponents said the concerns that we have. but they just really briefly, around the world, either countries in which they are as united and are working the same way that the u.s. government has 13 to be prepared to ad
CSPAN
May 10, 2012 8:00pm EDT
and first we'll hear from general lloyd austin bice chief of staff of the united states army. welcome general austin. >> good morning. chairwoman mccaskill, ranking member a odds and senator inhofe, thanks for the opportunity to appear here today to discuss the current readiness of your united states army. i've submitted a statement for the record and i look forward to answering your questions. these continues to be challenging times for our nations military and we have been at war now for over a decade. in fact ignore the time in history have americans servicemen and women thought for so long a period with an all-volunteer force and as you are well aware, we are still heavily engaged in operations in afghanistan. we recognize our military and inter-agency efforts there are extremely important. in spite of the heavy demands placed on our personnel and equipment, i'm pleased to report that ours remains a remarkably resilient force. our soldiers are continuing to do an outstanding job and they and their families have routinely done what we have asked of them. after more than a
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 11:40am EDT
the first. yes, sure. [inaudible] >> elaborate on the impact of the united states entry into the war. >> to elaborate on the impact of the united states entry to the war. the united states was part of the war effort from the beginning because we were selling large amounts of armaments to britain and france, not to germany and much of those sales on credit. because they were on credit, one impact of the war was to make the united states enormously wealthy because everybody ended up owing us money at the end of the war. militarily the u.s. entered the war in april of 1917, about a year and six months before the end. there was an enormous psychological boost for the our eyes when they u.s. entered. there wasn't much direct military effect immediately except on the oceans because of the u.s. had a surprisingly small standing army at that time. we did have quite a large navy which joined the british in hunting down german submarines. large numbers of american troops didn't begin arriving in france until may or june of 1918 and then they did have a considerable impact because the germa
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:25am EDT
way of them i lost faith in the united states of america. i have always believed before that the people from the justice when they couldn't anywhere else in the world. she then learned about the civil rights conference and begged them to help me. then they gave me courage to keep funding to win. i remember you when i was a girl how interested you were in negro people. please help me now. my people can't stand these police brutality is much longer. please answer. eleanor roosevelt wrote to several people she knew in new jersey and putting the attorney-general, they all assured the supreme court in the appeal would treat this case and a very fair manner and see that justice was done so eleanor roosevelt wrote that back bessie mitchell. the next bit was after the convictions were overturned on all six by the new jersey supreme court is that the speaker is paul robeson. i think some of you may know who he was, a fantastic human being, a huge black guy. he could sing, he could act, he was an athlete who was very active in civil rights and his time. the wealth of the u.s.a. was built o
CSPAN
May 15, 2012 8:00pm EDT
welcoming the president of the united states, george w. bush. [applause] >> thank you. please be seated. >> thank you for your kind words. all of us here today join you in hoping and praying for the end of violence and the advance of freedom and syria those that joined us for your example we honor your sacrifice and to celebrate your courage and we will support your struggle for as long as it takes. i want to think all of you for attending the washington launch of the freedom collection. i actually found my freedom by leaving washington. [laughter] but it's a good on occasion to be back to see old friends to a i want to thank those that work for the bush foundation and the more glendale's president. i think jimmy the founding director and all those that work for the bush institute. i want to thank you for joining us today. we are honored you are here. thank you for your leadership of the revolution. members of congress that join us i appreciate you taking time from your busy schedules. diplomatic corps think you for being here, and members of the bush at administration a mighty b
CSPAN
May 30, 2012 8:00pm EDT
we will see you next week. [applause] [inaudible conversations] .. the desired to be the best was very pronounced. >>> next, tv and radio talk-show host tavis smiley and princeton professor cornell west talk about poverty in the united states. the book is quote code of the rich and the rest of us." facebook last month at hunter college in new york city. this is about one hour and 20 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. first of all to dr. green, thank you for the invitation to be here tonight. dr. west and i are in the midst of what is about a three week tour across the country for this new text "the rich and the rest of us a poverty manifesto." and we were asked to consider making one of our stops here to support this great work. we immediately accepted in part because we believed in the work that marinas during and dr. west has appeared at the conference before and i was just at the writers' conference this year matter of fact just a couple weeks ago so i'm back in new york city. a couple weeks later. but we've been delighted on this tour to have about half, just over half of the stops have been to support fund raising efforts, those kind of causes and entities we believe in supporting sorted is defeating america and all of the insecurity that exists in this country or the national writers conference we have found ourselves traveling on this tour to libraries, to nonprofits, to corporations, colleges and universities and churches all across the country we've been talking about this issue of poverty, so we are delighted to be here tonight to support this work. we happen to be african-american writers, writers who are african-american so we again are delighted to be in new york city tonight and to offer our support thank you again for being here. thank you for showing tonight for this conversation. i want to talk for a few minutes about the book and set the stage for a greater talk for america's leading public intellectual. the person on a regard as the new boys in our time dr. west. i learned 25 years ago we became friends, and he is the big brother that i've never had. i'm the oldest of ten kids, the eldest of ten and so honestly have never had an older brother of peace i didn't have one until 25 years ago that reconnect it, and he is the younger brother of kristen west, and so he never had a younger brother. so, 25 years ago i became the younger brother he never had. he can the older brother that i never had and we have been running for 25 years together. and so, -- [applause] delighted to be sharing -- divided tonight to be sharing the stage with dr. west coming and we look forward to your questions and answers and the q&a with you i should say in gistel debt. but i have been fortunate for 25 years as his younger brother and his friend and his radio host on public radio international now almost 2-years-old. we have tried to do significant work being true to our vocation and calling and purpose to try to do significant work across the country the last 25 years individually and collectively and are around the world. but for all the work we've done we've never written a book. i was stunned the other day on somebody's program somebody counted the books i've written, counted the books and the total was almost 40 between the two of us refer to almost 40 books and edited others but we've never done a book to get worse this represents the first book that we've collaborated on and the subject matter would be the issue of poverty the rich and the rest of us a party manifesto and a filibuster as they say in washington to put to microphones in front of me anything is liable to happen. but i've been fascinated now that we have a week or so under our belt for orders could be a three-year tour across the country but now we've been out almost a week there are some reflections i can share. one of the things i've been struck by some things i didn't respect may i was naive i've been struck by the conversation that has kicked up about the title of the book. we have no issues whatsoever and it didn't spend any time whatsoever thinking that the title of the rich and the rest of us would be controversial i thought it was a great tidal because it was an act of a depiction of what's happened in america they are the rich and the rest of us and a party manifesto clearly not the issue is the we want to tackle in these 250 some odd pages there would be such a consternation shall we say in such controversy about the title but i don't know any other way to describe what's happened in america right now than to say there are neither rich and there are the rest of us. what we argue in this book we argue in the text that poverty threatens our very democracy. now i did believe that we might be just a little bit over the top in a book that suggests that poverty threaten our very democracy. we believe that to the bone. we believe that at the core of who we are that hour very democracy is threatened by the issue of poverty. we further argument the text only is our democracy threatened, it is in part threatened because poverty is not a matter of national security. that is how serious the issue is as we sit here in new york city tonight. one out of two americans -- people always ask us they will say using one out of two. the census bureau said. it's not like we made these numbers up. we had a wonderful researcher who helped us navigate through all the issues that we had about the case in the text but what our government tells us one out of two of us is living in or near poverty that's a crisis. i'm a math major that means 150 million people in this country are in or near poverty are the persistent poor. you take the new poor and we are doing this text of the near-poor poor horse a paycheck away from falling into that poverty of this. you put those groups of americans together and you talk about 150 million people who are wrestling with the issue of poverty either trying to get out or trying to make sure they do not follow in it is simply this. there is a highway into poverty for too many americans. the highway and but not even a side walkout when it comes to poverty in this country so easy these days for folks to fall into poverty. once you get stuck in the poverty of this it becomes very difficult almost impossible for so many americans to pull themselves out of it. one of the things i've also found interesting and fascinating is off to a plot so many people in these conversations want to talk about the plight of poor and the middle class. they want to talk about the middle class and what happened, they want to talk about whether or not the middle class is disappearing, how did this happen to the middle class. all kind of interviews and conversations on to talk to us when we get into discussing the book about the middle class and we are happy to do that because as i said earlier we believe and are due in the book the data that the middle class, the former middle class we once again find ourselves in a place in america where those that have been persistently poor, those that have been poor are still stuck right where they are and nobody is committed to having a conversation about those persons who have been starkly over a sustained period of time stock in this poverty of this suite try to talk about in the book in chapter 1 wheatley of departure of poverty. we thought it was important before we got into the subject matter to really remind people how we arrived at this place what has the majority been in this country that's allowed us to arrive at a place where we've never seen it quite as bad as it is right now and what you discover when you read the text as we discovered in researching it is that we of the ebb and flow in this country when it talks to our courage and conviction and commitment to address the issue of poverty. the reality is that the last time we had a sustained conversation in this country about poverty was during the johnson administration. you know this well, the war on poverty. that means that there's been a whole lot of democratic presidents. maybe that's a stretch, all told, but it does mean that there's been democrats in the white house and some republicans in the white house and neither of those administrations have taken the issue of poverty as seriously as they ought to come and so we argue in this text that it seems to us that there has been and still is a bipartisan consensus in washington that the poor just don't matter about the consensus that poverty is just not an important issue so how do we ever get traction on the issue, how we make it a priority of the two major parties and the heads of those parties don't make the minorities and the reader that four years ago when we exercise our right to vote in a presidential election barack obama was elected president and dr. west and i celebrated that. 65 different events to help dhaka, get elected president and for those persons who never seem to quite understand why he wants to hold the president that he fought for to get elected accountable to progressive policies just remember for what to the california is to help him get elected to hold somebody in the first place, but in that last election of 2008, three presidential debates between mr. obama and mr. mccain the word poor or poverty doesn't come off one time in those debates. obama doesn't raise it, mccain never utters it. the moderator's never asked about it. so three presidential debates taking place at the very moment that our economy is tanking and there's no conversation about the poor or poverty in this country. fast forward four years later and half of the citizenry is an or near poverty. we cannot abide another campaign for the white house where the issue of the poor in this country is not addressed. we can't go from here to november letting mr. obama and letting the presumptive nominee mr. mitt romney get away from having another contest with a contestation of poor people's humanities is the order of the day so we put this book out now and apologetically to do our part to remind the nation that we cannot render poor people and visible. we cannot treat them as an afterthought. we cannot at best and presidential election season treat them as some sort of a political calculation. it's telling the truth of allows suffering to speak. nobody tells the truth about the suffering of everyday people. it gets rendered invisible. it never gets addressed by the body politic. so how do you do that? you go to 11 states and 18 cities on the poverty tour bus as we did last summer trying to get an understanding, firsthand understanding on what it has done or did to the american public and we realize two things in no particular order, number one, we realize that the condition of poverty in this country is so by year that a slight uptick in our economy is not going to address the crisis. some believe when the job numbers come out on employment was down half a percentage point and start a break dancing in washington to make bad jokes all he wants about obama as the food stamp president when they take this broadcast two days ago on wednesday the agricultural committee of the united states house of representatives how can apply for food stamps. so just another example of the wrong headed notion that austerity is the answer at a moment like this tightening the belt on poor people further criminalizing them come further treating them as invisible isn't going to solve our problem. poverty is so deep and by year that a slide of to the economy is not going to address what we saw we now know for sure poverty is not color coded in this country. we seem to color could poverty in our situation so we think when we think poverty we talk about poverty with ink black, we think brown, that's what we mean by color coded it is all races, all colors, all creeds falling faster and poverty now than ever before. specifically women and children. we talk in this book about bill clinton, who i like and respect and she's a friend. i think she's still a friend. i said this a few times over the past couple weeks, maybe not the reality is nobody else in our society in part because the welfare reform bill 15 years ago peter edelman has a book of right now called so richard commesso poor we are not the only ones in caring for put people in this country we are not the only ones talking about before he ever got in the race talking about this particular issue and he famously predicted 15 years ago that this was going we were going to be reaping some dire consequences if bill clinton passed this law. he famously resigned his high post in the clinton administration in protest over this issue. fast-forward 15 years and i have news for you peter was right and that's why we see women and children falling faster than anybody. what does this say about a nation that allows women and children oftentimes the weekend vulnerable to fall into the abyss faster than any other group of americans so we saw that so dhaka year it isn't going to solve the crisis. it's no wonder color coded. we saw people are trying to hold on to their dignity. we believe if there is dignity in labor and in the war you have half of your population struggling to hold on to find a job you have a dignity deficiency and if it is a dignity deficiency, you have problems. i was watching an episode of 60 minutes a few weeks back and they have a panel about a dozen people who had once been in the middle class making mixed figures and the 401k in the savings account that we think coming along with having access to and having realized that middle class american dream all of them have lost their jobs. again mostly americans. i was fascinated to watch this story on 60 minutes a great piece and i remember vividly a particular woman having the last word in that conversation and she said, and i'm paraphrasing, that chaim beyond the embarrassment of having lost my job a few years ago. i'm beyond the interests and having lost my 401k and my savings account to date on and beyond the embarrassment of having lost my house how long i've been unemployed all i'm trying to do right now is colin to my dignity. it took me back the genesis for this text to akron ohio where we sat in a room full like this a room full of military veterans who had put their lives on the line, some of them injured to protect and preserve our freedoms. sure they are back on now and they've been unemployed for a year or two or three. guangya in the room who told a story that had me in tears she and his wife were having such a difficult time trying to make eight that after 25 or 27 or so years of marriage they had to split not because there was any trouble in paradise, there's no trouble in their love relationship but they couldn't come they didn't think they didn't come to a conclusion in their own relationship they didn't make it together that they had to split to try to make it and she's living animals all male shelter his living across town in an all female shelter they had to split poverty that they were enduring. we saw these kind of stories all across the country on an indian reservation and dr. west and i ask the native american brothers and sisters about the but the recession had done the replied what recession? we've forgotten about them. they don't even feel the impact of no recession. these are the depression conditions that we live with day in and day out, a year in and year out, and decade in and a decade out to get so americans again of all races and creeds are suffering in a way that many of us have never suffered. and the time to do something about that is right the book lay out in a very simple format the first chapter is a portrait of poverty how did we arrive at this place. second chapter is called the poverty of opportunity that we talked about why there is such a deficit, why there's such a party of opportunity in this country right now including these greedy corporations who are making more money at home and sending more jobs abroad that is one of the reasons there are many others, white is a poverty of opportunity in this nation right now but beyond the poverty of opportunity here is how we want to challenge americans to reexamine their assumptions about poverty to expand the inventory of ideas that it was about poverty to look through poverty to look at poverty through a different prism. we want to challenge for us to do that what it is we get an authentic answer and understanding about what poverty is so it's not a poverty of opportunity that the next chapter is of affirmation. what about a party of compassion a popular imagination in this country and we read through these countries the meritor is that we saw and spoke to, we spent time with people not just talking to them but on the tour we stay with poor people to really stay with a family that in kids, two dogs and three cats, stayed with them in columbus mississippi. we stood on the sidewalk one might stay all night sleeping with our friends we just talked to one of the edible days ago we try to stay in touch with people the best we can and we spent the night sleeping with some homeless folks in the nation's capal not too far from the capitol. we spent the night on the streets so we did get a sense of what we were doing. we are part of a program sponsored by feeding america so we didn't want to just go and take your camera us this became a dhaka entry on pbs we want to understand what these people were in during senator is a poverty of affirmation we know there's a poverty imagination and we also know near the end of the text that there are some law is, boulder out right demonic why is told of reading about poverty and poor people in this country. we want to debunk those and finally in this manifesto we lay out our plan and agenda because that is what matters. it doesn't take long in these interviews after a couple questions what is your plan, what is your solution? we've got one. at the end of the book there are 12 ideas we could have to be wrestled with sooner than right now and quicker at once if we want to be serious about reducing an erratic and in poverty in this country it can happen. this is not a steal problem this is a will problem. do we have the will to make poverty other countries have reduced poverty significantly because they came together with a national plan to make the reduction of poverty in their societies a priority we believe that poverty threatens our democracy and it is a matter of national security and to tell you more about why we believe that i want to introduce my public radio cohost, co-author of this book, america's leading public intellectual of our time my friend who has the heart generate lilos please welcome cornell west. [applause] >> let me first say i am blessed to be here and any time i have a chance to spend time with my brother tavis i have a smile on my face. as he said before, 25 years ago i met this brother and we decided that we were going to be willing to die for the legacy and diane - who had a love for people and especially who are brothers and sisters and all of us make a contract and has seen a mirror to leave to spirit dimension to it we are granted but whatever that has blessed us with to keep alive this tradition. we believe in the same cultural barriers but we refuse to move forward staying in contact with the best of those that have molded us so unique in the american culture working for the mayor of los angeles dividend a dynamite john bet and they've lost their jobs on bet. our dear brother bob johnson who had a mass demonstration with myself and to other friends. the black leaders that might be for, but the black elite function in such a way that after some phone calls were made and possible money it was just myself we will march any way. because i'm a christian country to love everybody. but i was disappointed. we went in deep prayer with my brother clinton to bounce back and remain true to your calling, not your career. don't become preoccupied with your job. have a sense of what your life past is. don't be obsessed with your profession. retired your vacation and be true to a people who are then enslaved, hated and despised and lift every voice. do not ever become an eco. be true to yourself. and he was down and out and he was broken in the ten commandments financially at that time and bounce back national public radio public tv tavis smylie foundation 13 years now she and i meet every summer with a young black youth or leaders i should say now it's thousands of them. we have to hunt them down. then of course the grand exhibition the books and so forth and so on and i do get upset oftentimes when i hear people say about a brother tavis slyly that somehow he doesn't have his focus on serving others because he's so successful and because he owns everything that he does like prince he believes in controlling his master's and i would just say to the world on notice brother he finds joy in serving others and if he's highly successful but he comes from a tradition that echoes 1045 and says he or she is greatest among you he doesn't confuse success with greatness. greatness has to do with service. what is the quality of your love for others. what kind of sacrifice will you make, what price will you pay? martin luther king jr. died with 72% of americans disapproving and 65% of black people disapproving of martin why? because he loves poor people and he was critical of the american occupation of vietnam. that's the tradition that we are talking about. we see it with a smile on our face. doctor, professor, her magnificent work i want the world to know i support your work and your struggle. [applause] the mother of two magnificent sons distinguished professors columbia law school and one of the great prophetic hip-hop artists of a revivalist to be in the studio with give the family a hand. professor smith. what the world to know in the sense of her black literature the only institution fundamentally committed to preserving the talent and the genius of the towering figures like gwendolyn brooks and tony morris and richard and ralf ellison and young brothers like kevin young. we just a black sister that won the pulitzer prize just the other day. tracy smith, give her a hand. we love you, sister tracie. she happens also to my colleague at princeton but i'm not saying this just because she is a fellow princeton ne. i'm saying this because she's an artist. the last line of the template of 1821 poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world not just talking about versify years, talking about all human beings who have the courage to muster their imagination to conceive of a world different than the one that we live in with more love and more justice and equality, more democracy and do what you can. use a bit of reality. if you're dancing it might just be your body. maybe it's raw material as an architect. whatever it is coming use your imagination to attempt to make this world better by conceiving of some alternative and transform the present world in light of a better world. that is the best tradition and general that puts at the center the dignity of those everyday people and james cleveland calls ordinary people it's a deeply space way of being in the world with affinities on the nellis side of town to rauf emmerson, ralph waldo emerson, our jewish sister who build on that tradition here in new york city concerned about the dignity of everyday people last but not least this is just my introduction. i'm moving on. [laughter] [applause] last but not least i want to congratulate my dear brother also has a publishing company and we have the legendary -- your social we want to acknowledge. i don't know where she is. and brother raymond ross. why do i spend so much time? because i believe always beginning on a note of gratitude to be a black man in america 58-years-old i am happy and partly still in my right mind. when i grew up brilliant black brothers and sisters much more talented than me. you look at my first great picture and i am the only black male living in that picture and i'm just 58-years-old. it is a professor west, you're so talented you didn't know the brothers and sisters we grew up with. if i'm just one-third of the person here. triet uzi on the corner that's what happened unpleasant thoughts we may end up in jail again. that's all right i have my senator closing on. i dress in black every day. why? because very much like the poverty tour it is a love to her. but the eyes lee brothers call a caravan of love. they are being treated unjustly. they are being treated unfairly. and if you don't do something they are going to cry out in the tradition that we are trying to keep a life very difficult these days when a poor people are caramelized and demonized on the side but also including our white brothers and sisters and appellation of poverty you would never know poor people even accessed if you look at the corporate media. do it never know poor people exist if you kept track of the dialogue between the politicians with the middle class. the working-class folks with a identity to get paid to months their poor. that is who we are talking about. [applause] it means you have to cut radically against the greens to even talk about the rich and the rest of us. one month before our occupied brothers and sisters and i want to affirm the occupied movement talking about corporate greed and wealth inequality we should have been talking about 30 years ago. should have been talking about that a long time ago. of 1% of the population owned 42% of the west. 2101% of the population got 93% of the income growth that means 99% of the rest of the population dealing with 7% of the income growth. what does that do, put us against each other. 22% of our children in poverty in the richest nation in history of the world that is a moral disgrace. let us never forget your indigenous brothers and sisters to your precious like each and every one of us no matter what civilization or sexual orientation 40% of our children living in poverty, 38% of our precious latino brothers and sisters living in poverty and 39%, 100% of the future and obsession with middle class. poor people don't vote. poor children don't vote, poor people vote but not at the same rate. we refuse to put up with that kind of truncated cents devotee. we are told it is a question of not having e.f. money. we gave $500 billion in the plan in the last 25 years to the industrial complex. we find the money when we build jails and prisons in the criminal-justice system but when it comes to education we can't find a penny and we have to cut it when it comes to jobs with a living wage weekend find a penny or we have yelled source. when it comes to decent housing and dilapidated school systems. when it comes to drones the special powerful the instrumentalities that can tell folks thousands of miles away supposedly telling terrorists were killed how many civilians so far in the last few years crux nobody's kidding track but it's about 850 minimum. we brag about killing osama bin laden pure it is a terrorist, yes he is. we can debate whether he would go back and forth. but when you kill his daughter, that's wrong. no justification for collective punishment. whatsoever. president and executive power can detain u.s. citizens with no due process, no judicial process whatsoever indefinitely to the interests are tied to terrorists groups or associated groups and i say to myself i went to south africa and they booted me out as a complement. i knew the underground police was tight. nelson mandela was on the terrorist list for 25 years of u.s. government. nobody is going to stand in the way of me being in solidarity with nelson mandela in the struggle against apartheid in south africa and under that same act she would be dragging me off the stage right now. because i'm a terrorist and i say yes i militant. the militant for kindness. like a brother martin used to say i want to be an extremist for love. that's how we are, brother tavis. it's true. [applause] i was blessed to write a song with a genius his last album of the hero in his basement in cincinnati ohio called when love is a threat, and anybody that looks poor people in america is a threat to the status quo with your question, jewish, hindu like gandhi, secular, atheistic, agnostic faugh poor people and poor children you're going to cut against the grain, and for your whole life not to be well adjusted to injustice. you're going to be maladjusted to injustice. you're going to be in the playwright that he was and play the misfits. brother tavis mildly and i decided in our text but we are misfits. we refuse to fit into the widespread indifference to the suffering of poor people. we refuse to view them as any way of but invisible we put them right at the center of the discourse but why is it so difficult one to associate with black people black face on welfare and anytime you put a black face on any issue in america, you can rest assured that unless value is placed on that issue because the history of america and of this legacy of white supremacy is what, lack of life has lost value. you sound like you are anti-american. i've been here for 13 generations. i am antiinjustice in america, not anti-american. that's why the text is rooted in the best of america's prophetic and progressive traditions but our progressive traditions now up until the occupied movement had been so weak and feeble in the last 30 years where it has taken place this attack on poor and working people and trade unions on poor children power from abroad look at our political system dominated by big money the republican party for the most part deeply conservative version of the oligarch rules of the all st. in the corporation's with the democratic party, neil liberal version of the oligarchy rules so much better than the republicans. it doesn't take too much when it comes to the treatment of working poor than the republicans. better than rod stewart when it comes to the song book. but give me sarah vaughn, frank sinatra and dean tawes bea come somebody who can really sing why we set the bar solo the democratic party would move year in and year out because we are better than the republicans you are not saying too much we are not just talking about political expediency in judgment. we understand that we are three critical of any of the candidates including a more member of the brother mitt romney, right-wing as he can be. mean-spirited towards the poor for the weak and vulnerable barack obama so much better, certainly better no doubt that's all we need to know that's the beginning of the conversation not the conclusion. why is it that both parties are extensions of the oligarchs and democrats at the top big money big bank and the corporation. if we organize and mobilize its crushed or infiltrated by the fbi. let's just be honest. in abramoff just sounding brassy that's what this text is about to tell the story of truth that he was talking about to allow severin to speak and that an apologetic loved as martin used to say just this is what looks like in poverty we have been so muted in raising our voices individually and collectively in the occupied movement in the treatment of poor and working people to be little to speak their truth to try to live their truth and listen and learn from others and then conclude poverty is the spiritual issue of our time. it's not simply a matter of politics and economics and there's no way that american democracy and all of the flaw would be will to survive, let alone thrive, if we don't just wrestle with poverty but we call for the elimination, the eradication of poverty. ' abolitionist. look at the history of the united states. after we so chronically mistreated our indigenous brothers and sisters, stole their land, violated the women and the man and the children that became the land base for the american space experience. then we enslaved the africans. that became the leader base for the american space. but the first is with what, to overthrow the monarchy because we began as a colony. and i am an antiand realist across the board which means i am and solidarity with the antiimperialism even as the slaveholders like george washington critical of the slave state, the slaveholder states that the imperialism the of over to the marquis de they did but it became what? slavery's we have a second american revolution to read the civil war. 620,000 to do what? fighting over 4 million inslee of africans like slavery, of the midst of the space experiment to madrid black soldiers joined the union army maybe we would not have sometimes i speak with of those in the south. maybe we should really treated to worry about smiley and west out there running to keep the ghazni grows under strict control but we broke the back of slavery. here comes the american terrorism by another name lunch break for a plaque that slavery until the 1960's crop on the basis of the list slavery, and here we are now 50 years after breaking the back of that american apartheid, the second american revolution. and what we need is a third revolution in america. he's a revolution from a revolutionary christian to beat deep democrat, peaceful resolution. we need a fundamental transformation of our economy and transfer of power from the oligarchic plutocratic control of resources to the space accountability to the ordinary citizens. oligarchy it's not the demonizing of oligarchs. it's not a demonizing of plutocrats. it is now the fundamental issue and it's tied to poverty and it's tied to the vast social conformity in america in which what? the everything is up for sale and everybody is up for sale and as long as you can be bought, you will never be willing to stick your back up until the truth about the circumstances under which we lived, and poor people will find themselves continually tied into the buying and selling of drugs. the buying and selling of drugs to deal with the survival with no possibility of the kind of effective organizing and mobilizing necessary for the effort peaceful american revolution that allows for the democracy to flower and flourish and calls the oligarchy and plutocracy into question. that's where we are. poverty is the new slavery and oligarchs are the new kings. and if we have the democratic energy from below, maybe we have a chance. working with the insiders, those that work within the system. we can go on the and on to. maxine waters. but then we need outside. we need folks that are willing to put their hearts and minds and bodies on the line in the streets and the jail organizing and mobilizing keating love and justice not hatred and revenge at the center. martin luther king jr. died calling himself a what? a revolutionary christian. we shouldn't even think of celebrating his legacy that we don't come to terms with that love supreme enacted in the movement of fraiman hammer and others montfort to keep the tradition alive to each and every american of every color recognizes in a crisis with in catastrophic conditions for. with the hatred or revenge and chaos. [applause] thank you so much for raising our consciousness and for putting this on the agenda. it's time to hear from you. i have questions from the audience and we have a number of questions, so i think it might be best if i just ask the question and whoever wants to respond can respond. the first question is what are your thoughts on student debt and poverty, and is debt forgiveness the answer to? >> when we know that student that has exceeded the credit card debt its researchers trillion dollars which nobody shows again what kind of value we put on the lives of our young people forced to go to school and college as increasing making it difficult for the very talented poor and working-class students to gain access to education. yet at the same time, when they apply for the loan, they have to pay high interest rates. none investment bankers get nearly 0% interest rates wouldn't it be nice for the students with any interest rate at all. again, you can see the hypocrisy in terms of how the will to do is treated as opposed to the working people. more and more students are coming to this conclusion in terms of the massive kind of organizing that is taking place. and i think that my only relief for this event that i would say the same thing of relatively when it comes to the mortgage, given the kind of predatory lending of the powerful ordinary people that led to catastrophe. that kind of perspective ought to be part of the discussion and keep in mind nothing that i say is definitive. it's a voice in the democratic conversation connected to public interest and common good and goes through arguments so forth and so on that's the kind of a voice that i would raise in talking about our students. >> just to follow up, we talk about the middle class the raising of the middle class. what happens to end poverty and recreate the middle class again? >> the last chapter in the book starts with telling a story about a conversation the president barack obama had with the late steve jobs and he was talking about the program he wanted to roll love and he did in fact little to calm his idea for in sourcing american jobs. he talked about that in this year's state of the union address but prior to that speech and prior to mr. steve jobs has dingley, president of the conversation with steve jobs as we recount in the book and he was asking steve jobs about all of these american jobs that had been shipped abroad and try to get him to talk about how the jobs could be in sourced and he wanted to pick his brain about this, so she wanted to say without blinking or batting an eye those jobs are never coming back. >> this is one of america's most celebrated ceos, corporate those jobs are not coming back. dr. west and i wrestled with for days at this point trying to come up with a single reason many american corporate ceo would be incentivized to actually hire back hit the workers were laid off and i'm sad to report but at least you know you're going to find in the book as you open up that we couldn't come up with a single reason. the only reason why any major american corporate multinational ceo is interest in hiring the folks they already laid off is the demand for your product is so high the u.s. to put more people on the line. you have to put more people in the pipeline to get the product made. .. who we gave all of our money to. we bailed them out and you know this, they are now sitting on a trillion dollars that they will not reinvest back in the economy so we gave him all this money without any strings attached and now we are begging them, and folks in washington are trying to come up with ways to incentivize them to put that money back into the economy. we gave you the money and now you are sitting on it. it. it out to be put back into the economy so that is why we don't have jobs, because they won't pour that money back into the economy. we don't have jobs so those jobs abroad and are going to come back on. the president has said not by their so it's a long answer to a simple question dr. green but the short answer is that i don't know. dr. west you suggested earlier and i concur we don't have an immokalee on the tree. what we call forced to bring together all these experts and craft a plan, a national plan, calling for a white house conference on eradication of poverty, bring all these expert mice together and fashion a national plan to reduce poverty over 10, 15 or 25 years. very quickly these ideas and plans are this. the catholic charities has one, jim wallace of sojourners has one. this is a well problem. we have the ideas. we have the ways & means to put together a national plan to make poverty a priority and reduce it and other countries have done it. we can do but i'd know how you bring the middle class back if we can't find a way to make jobs, jobs, jobs with a living wage a priority and i don't know how you incentivize the greed the american corporations shipping jobs abroad. that i don't know. >> can i just add though because tavis is the right. and of the reasons has to do with the fact that 40 years ago can i'm% of corporate profits in america were made by banks. today 42% of corporate profits are made by banks. what's the difference? this is between mitt romney and his father. his father was the head of american motors and they produced products for the consumers. mitt romney made his money with banks. he produced products and you introduce deals and made money by cutting workers so you don't produce things that can be bought at all. it is casino like. you are generating big, big, big money, billions of dollars at the top with no productive value for the society as a whole. so you end up with lives of the rich and famous and look serious and the cultural sub-- celebrity and people that want status of wealth and power and we see it of course throughout our culture. we see it in the hood, the ghettos. we see it in the middle class, we see it in our corporate television. we see it in critiques and we see it in our news shows. the aim is to and stimulate, bottom line, keep the frenzy. thank god tavis smiley amy goodman and the others, we don't want stimulation, we want information, lots elimination. we want analysis of what is going on. the only way to bring the jobs back is massive job creation programs. that's the only way you do it, rebuilding infrastructure, rebuilding the bridges, rebuilding housing across the border and providing jobs and it's not just public sector. he can be a combination that regard that is one of the reasons why it's so difficult to talk about jobs with a living wage and that is one of the reasons why it's so difficult or our leaders to really tell us the truth. the truth is -- steve jobs row four he died god bless us all. >> we believe destroying the middle class is really not an accident. the rich want to eliminate the poor and ignore policies and poverty, trying to understand this. they want to eliminate said they are using this in order to perpetuate the idea that there should be no middle class. that is not really an accident. it's a very conscious decision. can you comment on that? >> i just think it's greed run amok and i don't want to deal with the consequences. we live in a society that is so obsessed with instant gratification, instant stimulation, instant success. that is why i was making the joke, do you know what i mean? you can be a highly successful singer and he cannot sing. [laughter] >> that is true. that is true. that is true. >> because it's not about quality. it's about appearance. it's about spectacle and appearance and spectacle tyndale laid with angie stone and anthony hamilton and glenn jones, great singers, less success than -- who have made big money. some of them want grants. i won't follow through on that. [laughter] >> i want to add very quick, in the book we talk about this a little bit. i don't prescribe to the notion that the rich want to do away with the poor. i don't ride that because there is a whole lot of money being made on poverty. rich people are rich in part because of poor people. there is a lot of money made on poor people. in the back of the book leads debunk these 10 myths about the poor and one of them is that the rich pay more. last night we appeared on my friend stephen colbert's program and colbert has become famous over the last two years for the word he uses, truth in this -- truth ines. we quote colbert, it is truth when you say the rich pay more wealth and essentially the more wealthy make the more you pay taxes but they find a way to not pay taxes, loopholes. something is wrong when you and i and i'm on public television public radio and i don't know what you do for living but something is wrong when a couple of years ago general electric paid fewer taxes then you did. ge headquartered in this state, paid zero taxes two years ago. not a sense. not 1 penny of taxes for the entire fiscal year. they know how to manipulate and by the loopholes and work the process, where they pay nothing. >> the ceo happens to be the head of the commission on jobs. not to demonize jeffrey immelt but that is true. >> the stuff will drive you crazy. >> president obama's election. the rich make a lot of money off of the poor. it is not altogether true that the rich pay more, and one of the reasons and we talk about this in the text as well, we have a number of national conversations that i moderated for c-span and -- c-span is here today as a matter of fact. [applause] i have been fortunate to moderated number of conversations rod cas live over c-span and for that matter we repeatedly broadcast on pbs over the last couple of years. in new york here at ny q. a conversation about women and children in poverty in america. earlier this year in washington, george washington university, nbc a conversation that included michael moore and an area where poverty is run amok. michael moore who we give some space in the book to share particular belief, explains in very simple and straightforward detail how and why, the how the crisis came to be. he is a documentarian and he has studied this and then work on it and the simple answer is, what is the one thing dr. green, that the middle-class has that we can rape and pillage? their homes. the one thing they all have, the one thing they all have equity in is their homes. he goes into a deep treatment and i will let you read it in the book about how in part, in part we got into this housing crisis by going after people who were in the middle class and trying to get into the middle-class. we know homeownership is the surest and safest most secure way in america to start to create wealth and that was the one thing they knew that they had not figured out a way to rape and pillage. they figure that out and the rest as they say is history. there are some great stuff in the book about the middle-class. >> follow the steps because first you have to have two sponsors working -- spouses working and you need a credit card because you don't have the money so all of a sudden now you are in debt and then you run out of debt and the only thing left is your wealth, your house. than your house is gone, so what is left? now they are going into other parts of the world. >> that is what i mean by greed running amok. >> is a human thing. i have got greed inside of me but i'm just working on it. when that greed runs amok like death that than the system itself begins in an ugly way in the most important thing for me is what happened to the children. >> just to follow up on that, you talked about how poverty cuts across racial division, and the question is, what is the role of continuing racial division in maintaining silence of our class in political discourse? poor blacks, poor whites and poor hispanics have much more common with each other but racial separation keeps them from recognizing and acting on their shared interest. how do we cross the divide and generate the power of the poor? >> divide? i thought we were post-racial america. [laughter] >> this is a doctoral student asking this question, the reality. >> i want the doctor degree to respond to it. >> the truth-tellers come in all forms. he didn't go to college for two colleges went to him. he is a truth teller. a lot of folks go to college -- if you don't understand the difference between education and cheap schooling, they just want to get schooled and don't want to really be educated and challenge. i think that question about how is it that we can come together as human beings acknowledging the legacy of white supremacy and anti-semitism, anti-arab and anti-muslim, hey check, and so forth that divide and conquer strategy, those powerful persons often reinforce the possibility is coalescing and uniting become very very difficult. we saw this here new york with the occupy movement. those are just young sisters and brothers on the other side of town. they talk about corporate greed, does that affect you? very much so but i not used to spending time with them. you can contact with the truth they are talking about. if we don't come to terms with that then we have another divide and conquer. let's connect police brutality and let's connect stop and frisk and connect the -- becoming more and more vanilla market driven. let's tell the truth about that and let's do it in such a way that it is broad enough moral vision to allow us to calm together. that is in part what martin was trying to do in the poor people's campaign and that is why he was viewed as the most dangerous person in america. we have got to build on that. >> one of the questions, this is the last question, is the whole concept of poverty is a matter of national security. can you elaborate on that? how is poverty a matter of national security? [laughter] i saved save that one for last. >> usually we talk about national security that we are talking about foreign policy and wars and external threats. but, we know that when people write the histories of civilizations and the history of social regimes in the history of empires, it's usually as a result of internal rot that imparts collapse. it's not external threats. and when you look at the internal rot in america, all you have got to do is look at the prison industrial complex. all you have to do is look at the schools in the poor children and the privatizing efforts and the attacks on teachers. those -- no serious commitment to it. it. all you have to look in his the workplaces and how many people are not dissatisfied with their jobs that but feel as if they have some physical -- on their job. wises so many citizens find some instant gratification in self-medication? and addiction, pervasive across class? those are all signs of decay and decline. so when you talk about national security and national -- national security it is internal and that doesn't mean we shouldn't have foreign-policy but that is precisely what we are trying to deal with. >> to add to that briefly, when i say it's a matter of national security i don't mean to suggest in addition to what dr. was just offered. my read of history suggest that there is no empire in the history of the world that at some point did not alter or fail. every empire has its day. every empire has its moment. i don't know what it is about us in america and i will be accused of being anti-american for even suggesting this. i don't know if that is our narcissism, our arrogance or hubris or a patriotism, our nationalism, whatever reasons we as americans want to consider that we could he on the edge, that we could be on the precipice, that we could be on the verge of imploding from that internal rot, and we take this on, we take this head-on in the book, this whole notion of america's exceptionalism, and there are so many of us who still believe that we are the biggest, we are the baddest, we are the oldest and we are all that and then some because we are the united states of america. and today it -- the data just does not bear that out. one of two avenue americans is either in or out of poverty. don't talk to me that american exceptionalism. is reading an interesting article today about president obama urging to be more confident on the campaign trail, to be more -- to express more enthusiasm about her future. you have to be more reaganesque and they were pushing him to change the narrative a bit. dr. wes said earlier and i agree when you love people you tell them the truth. the american people are not being told now the truth. i cannot abide another campaign where we get lied to or we don't want to deal with what is happening in the country. and the doctor is right. for all the talk about -- this country is not going to go under due to an outside force. our military budget is still -- we can protect ourselves. that doesn't mean we are not going to get hit again but we have the military might and the wherewithal to protect ourselves. that is not what is going to take us down. what is going to take us down is right here on the inside and the fact that we do not take the issue party seriously in the fact that we don't see it as a national security issue, the fact that we don't see it as the moral and spiritual issue of our time, it's not just a political issue and it's not just an economic issue and it's not just a social or corporal issue. this is the moral and spiritual issue of our time. to the extent we make like the ostrich and put our head in the sand and ignore what all the signs are telling us, we are going down. because every empire eventually goes down. we can put on a happy face in act like we are all that all we want to but this is the reality we are dealing with and we are not the first ones and we are not the only ones trying to ring the alarm. trying to sound the bell. there are whole lot of folks who have been long-distance runners on this issue but in this residential election season and i said earlier tonight, we cannot go to -- we cannot endure another campaign for the white house with this issue just getting ignored. and all the data just you know, we act like it doesn't fit. and so that is why for me it's a national, matter of national security. that is why for me it is the moral and spiritual issue of our time and again dr. westin die on the poverty tour, we spoke at the poverty tour last summer and we knew that it could not stop at the tour. we knew it could not stop there. we knew it could not stop there and it became talking about women and children in poverty and we knew it could not stop there. we are committed and have been committed collectively to raising our voices on this bigger issue but there is no time like the present to get serious about this. poverty robs the spirit. poverty robs the spirit of the vision and where there is no hope for the future, there is no power in the presence. there is no power in the presence. when you have half of your -- trying desperately to hold on, 1/2 of your populace is trying desperately to hold onto their humanity, you see where this ends up. there is a reason why each of them exploded and the reason why the human exploded and we don't want to come to terms or wrestle with again howell on the edge we are. now is the time for that. we have to make poverty a priority in this country. dr. green it was wonderful for you to have us here tonight and we celebrate your legacy. >> thank you are thank you very much. [applause] >> you more booktv coming up on c-span2. in a moment, grover norquist of americans for tax reform talks about jobs and economy under president obama. the book is debacle. next grover norquist of americans for tax reform and political commentator john lott discuss their book, "debacle" obama's war on jobs and growth in and what we can do now for a future. this event was hosted by americans for tax reform and an american spectator. >> good afternoon everybody. welcome to our newsmaker lunch for today. it's an ongoing series sponsored by "the american spectator" magazine and americans for tax reform. i am jim antle from "the american spectator" and we are here to discuss a new book i grover norquist, public enemy number one of taxation in america and the economist john lott. over the next few months we will be hearing a lot of positive statistics on the president about how he is turning the economy around and he deserves a second term on the basis of progress toward reversing unemployment and making all kinds of the economic situation better, moving us away from the great recession. the book we are discussing today however, paints a much different picture of the president's economic policies and i think it sums up very well the book title, "debacle" and i i don't think a lot of their portrayal of what the president's record is going to be on jobs, economic growth, the extent of revelation and spending and deficit spending perpetuated by this administration will be very different from what i think you will be hearing on the campaign trail from the incoming president. to sort of kick it off we will have grover start with his thoughts about what they're trying to do when they wrote this book and their vision for the economy under obama. >> the book has three parts to it. the first is people are more familiar with, the failure freddie mae and fanning -- fannie mae and freddie mac and how that led to the financial crisis, and then part one, and then the question of how the obama and the stray shin and the latter part of the push of administration reacted to that with bailouts and the stimulus spending, for different stimulus packages, not just the big when we generally think of and why that actually made the recession worse and the recovery weaker and creating fewer jobs, increasing gdp less than other countries which didn't see stimulus spending and and a our recovery is weaker than previous recoveries because you can compare what we are going through now with the reagan recovery, with the ford recovery, recovery back to the great depression or you can compare it with other countries that are going through what we have been going through in the last several years. in both cases, the obama recovery is weaker, less strong and in some cases weaker than what has happened in the past. huai? unlike reagan who got a deeper recession in terms of destruction of jobs, 10.8% unemployment at 10.1 and reagan had to wrestle double-digit inflation at the same time, what obama did was not reduce marginal tax rates and spending from where it was going and deregulate. he did the opposite and particularly on the stimulus package you have to ask yourself, now what was the theory? the theory was if the government would take a dollar from somebody you aren't it coming either in taxes physically take it or in fact you borrow it and you hand that to somebody who is politically connected, that there are now more dollars in the economy. that there are more jobs in the economy. the idea being that if reid and pelosi and obama went to one side of the lake in each had a bucket and tipped it into the lake and they took their three buckets of water around to the other side of the lake and in front of the "msnbc" camera sports a three buckets back into the lake, they will have stimulated the lake to great depths. this is the theory they were our parting on. not only is there the same effect, the same amount of water in the lake, minus whatever chicago takes home with them, but at the same time what incentives does this give to the person who worked on saturday, whose dollar you took for this experiment? do they keep working? do they hide their resources, and what incentive does a get to the person who because they were politically connected or did what the government wanted instead of working, they got the dollar because. it give that incentive to the people who receive the cash and disincentives to work saving investment, to the people who are earning for dollars in the first place. it shouldn't surprise us that this didn't help the recovery, didn't cr
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May 29, 2012 12:45am EDT
states it should be made in the united states. in hamilton you go to those old republicans -- [applause] they believe that. the old republicans that built this economy, hamilton, henry clay, lincoln, mckinley. we wrote a book the great betrayal. they are discouraged in the free trade. they believed free trade because we are going to dump our goods there and charge tariffs on goods coming in here. they were not about a level playing field, they were about winning. >> a lot of liberals would agree and i remember one story they told me someone came to interview you and she was right you had a very long hair. she said i think he may have been gay. [laughter] you're the first that spoken about the power in politics. >> i think that it was in iowa and a fellow came along and i think that he was gay, he had a hearing and stuff. [laughter] most of the time when i grew up they didn't have a hearings and stuff. but he was in the car with me driving along asking me questions and he was clearly a left wing and finally he said, you know, my whole life i've been looking for someone who w
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 8:30pm EDT
difficult jobs in the united states government former administrator of the tsa. someone came to the issue after 9/11 with the faa perspective also from the private sector with supply chain, risk, that we talk about today with aviation security. the verbs are not always the same as the now not only to comment on his time with the tsa but also a bit of a landscape where we are, where we hope to be with major gaps and shortfalls that we can enhance the country's capability. this is one of the toughest jobs. most people's impression is the dna are irs that is the next agency that has the most contact in the environment they have an important mission. shortly after 9/11 there were steps in what that needed to be taken and quickly. we have to ask the hard questions and you are here to make us smarter. if you have not bought it yet, "permanent emergency" buy it. doing the interviews call in this have to do with your book. the floor is yours. >> thank you for the introduction and for hosting this. praying this consistently same voice in the of the why is it discombobulated world and it is a
CSPAN
May 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
chess players in the united states although i gather -- while he was at stanford he found the stanford review at a time when there is little by way of an outlet for conservative or libertarian voices for students. after law school he clerked for judge edmondson on 11th circuit, spent a short time the credits but then cofounded paypal. the rest is well known. peter treated a place for himself. he also created a place for himself as a public intellectual and provocateur, and is also well-known for his support of such things as the institute on artificial intelligence, the institute which creates autonomous libertarian communities, and most recently the fellowship for young entrepreneurs which is for young people who may be better served not going to college than doing so. he teaches an occasional class at the law school, actually teach a law school as often as i can persuade him to take the time to do so. the way i conceptualize that class is basically as the world according to peter teal, and i don't care what he does. [laughter] seriously, the idea is if you have a law school, you can
CSPAN
May 29, 2012 5:00pm EDT
, understood it was not to protect them and it was to protect the united states from europe. they were basically and inconveniently at the wrong place at the wrong time and subject from -- to threats from russia if we made that deployment. the secretary put together a team to look at beginning to negotiate a new treaty. the decision was not to extend it, but get a new s.t.a.r.t. treaty. at the same time, a decision was made with the white house to use the negotiation of a new treaty to reset the relationship. a relationship characterized by mutual destruction, no longer the posture we have between ourselves and former soviet union, russia, towards a more different, more cooperative relationship that is mutually ensured state. that success of getting the new treaty and disescalating tensions was important and also got us a relationship with russia that enables us to work closely on things with iran, more successfully clearly than syria and libya, but the iran and north korea situation, we have a much more, i think, respectful and successful relationship in getting things done. we also w
CSPAN
May 9, 2012 9:00am EDT
no specific credible information regarding an accurate terrorist plot in the united states at this time and also comments by white house counterterrorism adviser john brennan when clearly there was a device that has been deemed to be a viable ied that was intercepted by the cia. how the administration can make these assertions that there is no credible plot underway? >> the statement was that there was no specific credible plot tied to the anniversary of bin laden's death. so, and that was and is an accurate statement. it was accurately made. the key point is that we will be taking all appropriate measures, now that the plot has become public, to make sure that the aviation and the traveling public remains safe. we will be working with airlines. we will be working with more nations. the tsa doesn't do passenger screening in foreign airports. they do that, so there will be and are all appropriate measures are being taken. >> it sounds like it was a parsed statement. >> did was, and it was for a good reason. it was because we needed to protect and are protecting the plot that was unv
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 10:40am EDT
people. they refused me in a nice way. then i lost faith in the united states of america. i had always believed before that the people found justice here when they couldn't anywhere else in the world. then i learned about the civil rights congress. i begged them to help me. first, they start to restore my faith in the american people, then they gave me courage to keep fighting to win. i remember you when i was a girl, how interested you were in negro people. please help us now. my people can't stand these police brutalities much longer. i remain humble, betsy mitchell. p.s., please answer. eleanor roosevelt wrote to several people she knew in new jersey including the attorney general. they all assured her that the new jersey supreme court would, in the appeal, would treat this case in a very fair manner and see that justice was done. so eleanor roosevelt wrote that back to betsy mitchell. the next little bit is after the convictions were overturned, all six, by the new jersey supreme court. it is at a mass meeting in trenton. the speaker is paul robison. i think some of you may
CSPAN
May 3, 2012 5:00pm EDT
negotiator for the united states at the time of german unification in 1959, and it was an interesting example of state craft and the public's understanding because what our initial read of the situation in late after the berlin wall opened was the people of east germany wanted what the west germans had. there was a school of thought at that time called the third way saying, no, no, we're creating our own separate state. i was in east germany shortly after the wall opened, and i was in lute ran churches -- lutheran churches who played an important role in the civil society in such it could exist with the democratic republic, but what i could see was this was not going to be a merger. it was going to be a takeover because people wanted what west germany had. okay? it was an understanding of the whole momentum of the next 11 months that east germans were going to come one way or another. understanding societies, understanding the messaging, you know, even if you're a diplomat in the state department, it's critically important, and certainly in the world of development or trade or others,
CSPAN
May 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
are not strangers for the united states. they shouldn't be strangers. it's been true that it has been 17 years since the socialists were in power and had the presidency but of course they ran the government about a decade ago when he was in power. we've always had a good relationship with any government that is there in france and i am confident we will have a good relationship with this government in france. we do have to see how this government has, is going to deal with it the issues of the day. it is one thing to be campaigning. it is always something different to be governing. it is not up to me, certainly not my job to predict how this will evolve but i would note that francois hollande during the campaign did say he would remain, keep france integrated in the military command structure. that was a remarkable decision by president sarkozy after so many years to come back into the command structure. i think france learned in the libya operation that being integrated into the command structure gives you a voice and a say over what happens in the internal affairs of a military oper
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 10:00am EDT
to be intent on attacking inside of the function the united states. they didn't want to put it on the front page. 9/11 happened 10 or 11 weeks later. ever since then, i have been following al qaeda and terrorism as much as peter has. starting in 2002, i got a tip. we mentioned this in the prologue of the book. i was in a bar in new york city talking to a bunch of agents who were from the fbi task force there. in comes the bomb squad, who were the investigators to the 9/11 plot. after we were talking about terrorism, because they couldn't talk about investigation, i said give me a table or it leads go on. one of them said, he looked around and said in a stage whisper, gentoo. i wrote it on a cocktail napkin and started making calls the next day. the reason i mention this, writing about all of jim al qaeda and osama bin laden, ksm already unction always stood out as much more different than the others. he seemed more politically oriented than others. he liked to have a good time come he had a sense of humor come he was much more organized. gsm was the one who is traveling around the wor
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